Tag Archives: cdt

Day 1. 

5/5/17

Miles: 25.9

I got up at 5 and grabbed continental breakfast where three very thru hiker looking folks were sitting around and talking about Crispr/ Cas9 gene editing. Turns out it people who drive the shuttles! Then a few thru hikers trickled in. Acorn also showed up! I met Acorn around Kennedy Meadows on the Pacific Crest Trail in 2014. Then she was a few days behind me on the San Diego Trans-County Trail this winter. Now she’s a few days ahead of me on the CDT. She’s going to slackpack south today, as she’s alreaidy hiked the section form the border back to Lordsburg earlier this week. 

Only four of us thru hikers are going to the border today. Me and three other guys. The German guy I saw yesterday, a guy named Gibbs and a dude named Dillon. We pack our gear and toss it into a pickup truck to be driven to the border. It’s about a three hour drive, half on pavement, half on crazy remote and rough dirt roads. We see a coyote, some roadrunners and pronghorn from the car. Finally at the border we make it to the Crazy Cook monument. Is named after a slab of concrete with an inscription saying someone was murdered here in cold blood by a crazy cook in 1907. We all take photos at the obelisk and then start our hike! Gibbs is off first, then Dillon and I hike together, followed by the German guy.

  • Little horned lizard!Mexico is just behind this fence! Dillon and I chat and hike together all day. It’s nice to find other hikers out here to socialize with. We find lots of cool lizards like short tailed horned lizards and then beautiful greater earless lizards which run to the nearest rock and do push-ups at us. We also come across an abandoned bicycle in the middle of the trail which seemed pretty weird. Midday was very hot, I could almost feel my brain cooking even with my chrome umbrella over me. We took a long break at the first water cache and decided we could make it to the second one about 10 miles away. Little did we know the next section of trail was ROUGH. The trail vanishes and it’s time for cross country travel. We select distant bushes and walk towards them for miles at a time and then take breaks under their shade. The routes all require you going in and out of gullies over and over which is exhausting, all the while the vegetation slices your legs up. Our mileage dropped drastically and it no longer looked like we would make it to the cache before dark. 

Ocotillogreater earless lizard walking through the ocotillo for days!bullhorn!

As the sunlight faded, we took a break and prepared for about 4 miles of walking in the dark/ twilight. The moon was out and it’s actually pretty easy to see everything. We even spotted a herd of cows we had to walk through. They seemed pretty confused. We reached the cache at 9:45 pm and got all the water we need and at dinner. Cowboy camping tonight, so excited to sleep. 

Dillon in the road at night

Advertisements

Day 0. Travel Day

5/4/17

Woke up at 4:00 a.m. which always seems to be the time to start a great adventure. Flew out of the Cincinnati airport at 7:00 a.m. to Atlanta and managed to dodge all the storms in the area! Ran as fast as I could to my next plane which was already boarding when I landed (it always seems I either have 25 minutes or 12 hours between flights) and then took off for El Paso, Texas. After landing in El Paso, I got an Uber. My driver is from Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, which is directly across the Rio Grande from El Paso, Texas. She says that even though they’re right next to each other, the culture is very different. She says everyone on the American side is too rushed and frantic. Mexico is more relaxed and people know their neighbors better. It’s a lot cheaper to live there too. 

She drops me off at the public library in El Paso because I forgot to print out my Greyhound bus ticket. They need a physical paper ticket, I assumed they were like airports these days. Anyways, I quickly print off my ticket in the computer lab and then have nothing to do for 5 hours. The bus station is conveniently a short walk from the library. I go to CVS and buy a little supplemental food and then mosey on over to the bus station. I know bus stations kind of have a stigma to them… I get it now. Five TVs are playing the People’s Court with all the sound slightly off and they all echo. It got a little better when five Steve Harvey’s started hosting Family Feud. One of the TVs looks like it got punched because it’s all warped and green in the center. About an hour before I board I see a guy walk in and immediately I can tell he’s a thru hiker due to the Gregory backpack and lack of face tattoos. He’s from Germany and this will be his first big thru hike. Looks like we will be on the same shuttle to the border tomorrow! Look at all that trail ahead!

The bus ride is uneventful and smells like pee and poop. After 3 hours or so the bus dropped me off at the McDonalds on Lordsburg around 8:30 pm local time. I grab some fast food and head to my motel room at the Econolodge. I sent my trekking poles and umbrella ahead to the motel a few days ago so I didn’t have to be bothered by trying to take them as carry on luggage on the planes. They have always let me take them but also always stop me and heckle me until I tell them I’ve done it before and that satisfies them. I take a shower, get my gear ready and go to bed. 

It all starts in the morning.

Continental Divide Trail Gear List and Food

Just over a month to go! I’m so excited I can hardly stand it. Here I have compiled a list of the gear I will be taking on this trip. I have my Base weight calculated (all of your gear minus the clothes you always wear on your body and consumables such as food, water and fuel). Some items will be variable such as how many water bottles I’ll carry, depending on where I am on the trail. I’m starting with 6 just in case in the desert but will only carry 2 in Colorado and probably other northern parts of the trail.

Backpack and Water Treatment and Storage:
Pa’lante Packs Simple Pack with hipbelts about 15 oz
Sawyer squeeze 2.7 oz
6 1 liter smart water bottles 12 oz
Subtotal 29.7 oz

Sleep system:
Six Moon Designs Wild Oasis tarp tent with insect netting 13 oz
6 Aluminum tent stakes 3 oz
Enlightened Equipment Enigma 20 degree down quilt 19.4 oz
Gossamer gear airbeam air mattress 10 oz
Polycryo ground sheet 1.6 oz
Subtotal 47 oz

Clothing in Backpack:
Patagonia Men’s Capilene Midweight Crew undershirt 6.7 oz
Patagonia Men’s Capilene Midweight Bottoms 6.8 oz
Go lite down jacket 7.5 oz
Spare socks 3 oz
Enlightened Equipment Sidekick booties 1.5 oz
Outdoor Research Helium II ultralight rain jacket 6.4 oz
Subtotal 31.9 oz

Miscellaneous Items:
Petzl e+LITE Headlamp 1 oz
Sunglasses .7 oz
Toothbrush and toothpaste 1 oz
Compass .8 oz
Tiny Swiss Army knife .5 oz
Sunscreen 2 oz
Tenacious tape, sewing needle and dental floss .2 oz
Mosquito head net .7 oz
Swing Liteflex Silver Trekking Umbrella 8 oz
Subtotal 14.9 oz

Electronics:
Chargers 2 oz
Anker battery 15000 mwh 11 oz
Olloclip macro lens for IPhone .8 oz
Sony Cyber‑Shot DSC‑RX100 II 20.2 MP 9 oz
SPOT Gen3 Satellite GPS Messenger 4 oz
Subtotal 26.8 oz

Total Base Weight: 150.3 oz or 9.39 lbs
All my gear outside of the pack
All gear inside the pack!

The size of the gear I carry has shrunk considerably since my southbound 2012 Appalachian Trail hike with Buzz Lightyear. I think I was lugging about 45 lbs in my 85 liter external frame pack when I started that hike. I had a machete, fishing pole, slingshot and tons of other useless shit. We had no idea what we were doing or what we had gotten ourselves into! By the time we got to Dalton, Massachusetts my pack was a 30 liter day hiking backpack that weighed about 25 lbs fully loaded (thanks to Tom Levardi for taking us to an outfitter)!

atA happy fool

I am one of those manics that never cooks on trail, I’m way too lazy to want to lug around extra water for cooking, then have to set up a stove, boil things and then clean out pots covered in gunk. I’ll just get warm food when I get to town in a few days. It just makes it that much better! The plus sides of this is I don’t have to worry about refueling, carrying a stove, fuel, pots/cups, or even utensils. No chores or wait time in the morning or at night and I don’t send up a beacon of scent to all the animals in the forest. “If you don’t cook then what the hell do you eat?” I eat whatever sounds tasty at that moment. I have no meals planned out, just a big bag filled with all my food. When I wake up I might eat some carnation breakfast essentials, granola bars, fruit and nuts. In the afternoon maybe chocolate, nuts, fruit, jerky, granola bars, and then the same for the evening.

I bought food enough for 9 boxes to be sent to locations along the CDT where there is either no resupply at all or very meager choices (a gas station for example). That being said, I have stuck to a lot of my usual favorites again like various granola bars, pistachios, pecans, pine nuts, jerky, candy, dried fruit, as well as lots of freeze dried fruit this time around. I found a company that sells freeze dried fruit in bulk for very cheap by accident a few months back. Its called Emergency Essentials and it is really more geared towards filling up your nuclear bunker than for hiking, but the freeze dried products are useful just the same. I have tons of freeze dried strawberries, peaches, raspberries and cinnamon apples. They weigh almost nothing but do take up a good amount of space. And don’t worry about not using them for awhile because as the bottom of one of the cans read, “best if used before May 2039.”

One of the items that I’m super excited for this time around are a variety of Salazon chocolate bars. They were created by a thru hiker and all have salt in them. The idea was that tasty chocolate could also be salted to help keep a hiker’s electrolyte levels up while at the same time eating one of  a hungry hiker’s favorite foods. They taste so freaking good.

I’ve also got a new camera this time around. Its the Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 ii which is the camera Twinkle Toes and Bigfoot use on their adventures. I’ve played around with it a little bit and am stoked to use it on trail.

Less than a month to go! I can’t wait to meet other hikers and get back to doing what feels so right. Walking slowly across the varied surface of a planet and observing the other organisms that we inhabit this rock with.

Day 13. Beauty abounds.

7/12/16

Frenchman creek to county road 343 
16.1 miles 

Since we have no need to hurry we sleep in. Hit the trail around 7. It’s a nice sunny morning hike as we walk past some lakes and get views of a nearby valley which has smoke floating in it. Must be some forest fires nearby. We’ve heard about some on the news but can’t remember where they are. 

Gotta love the still water’s reflections

Distant forest fire smoke hangs in the valley

We make it to a creek and have second breakfast there. Two other hikers with ultralight packs are also eating there. The girls go ahead while I continue to eat and filter water. I make a mix is crystal light and maltodextrin for the hike up the hill. Maltodextrin is a high calorie carbohydrate that is easily processed in your body to energy and can be drank on the go with no need to stop for food. It’s a 2500 foot climb up the hill and very steep. The sun is blazing and it makes for a challenging hike. I put on my music and smash up the hill as fast as I can for awhile just to see what I can do. I keep a fast pace for a mile or so until I pass the girls and then it’s just too hard to catch my breath and I slow down for the rest of the climb. Feels good to really push yourself sometimes. You get an exercise high. I listen to Disney songs until the top. 

Bird of prey apparently are attacking people here.

Right where I belong

A metallic wood borer. Buprestidae family.

I wait up top until rapunzle shows up. She points out that there is a trail to a nearby bald so we drop packs and hike up it. There is a panoramic view of mountains all around. Mt. Yale is nearby and other distant 14ers are visible. We can also see several forest fires in the distance. We check the news and it looks like the fires aren’t too close to the trail. We hike back to our packs but don’t see Leah or Blistfull. Another hiker says the rushed on by.

Coming up the bald with Mt. Yale in the back.

🇺🇸

It’s more than a 3000 foot descent to a creek where we run into Leah and Blistfull who had thought we were in front of them so they were rushing to catch us as we were rushing to catch them! They didn’t see our packs in the shade. Oh well! We eat lunch and fill up on water and then walk an easy 3 miles to an awesome campsite near cottonwood creek around 3:30. We all jump in the icy water and cool off. It is still hot out so we warm up fast. We eat dinner and all get very drowsy and want to sleep even though it was a short day and only 4:30. We lounge around staring off into space and watching ants take away the flies we kill. There is a huge ant mound in our camp and all dead flies and crumbs end up in the mouths of the workers. 

In the evening Leah’s friend Ed shows up to help her get new shoes and surprised us with a watermelon as trail magic! We feast on it. It’s so fresh. Soon he starts cooking his dinner on a big pot on an old school MSR white gas stove. Pizza is his dinner. He lubes up a pot with olive oil, puts in some dough he made and cooks it. Then he adds pizza sauce, tons of cheese, and pepperoni. It smells so good. Then he makes another one for us! It’s doughy, melty and absolutely delicious. Some serious trail magic! We hit the hay soon after our treat. 

Down down down

Leah with the honor of cutting the watermelon. 

Day 4. Night Terrors

Miles: 22.2
Total: 104.1

Imagine you’re fast asleep, warm in your shelter. You wake up to an occasional pitter patter of raindrops knocked loose by the wind from the tree above you. You fall right back to sleep. Then you wake up to what sounds like a twig falling on your shelter, but it sounds a little odd. You can’t figure it out so you go right back to sleep. Then you are awoken to the sound of your shelter being shaken back and forth violently and you can see just the shadow of a large furry animal moving around just 2 feet from you and it is pushing into your shelter towards you! Welcome to my morning! With my senses all foggy from just being awakened by an animal thrashing the side of my little tarp tent my first reaction was to smack the side of the tarp to try and scare the attacker away while simultaneously uttering, “UHHH! Yaaaaa! Wuaaaahh! Ahhhh!” There wasn’t time to think of words, just primal fear sounds. After smacking the side of the tent I could see the animal, either a big fox or coyote, from the 6 inch gap under my tarp where the insect netting is. Because I had no time to find my flashlight I could only see this large animal’s outline. It was undeterred by my smacking towards it at first, then it grabbed my tent and something in the tent and tried to run away with it, the insect netting prevented it, I saw the creature run away about 20 feet, then change its mind and run right back at me and grabbed onto the item again and try to pull it away but by now I had the flashlight and I was screaming at it as it pulled away. Finally it ran off and my fellow campmates Gordon and Christian were awake and hopped out of their tents. I got out too and looked around for the suspect but it was gone. I found that it had pushed its face into the netting far enough to reach my food bag, then try to pull it through. During the shaking it ripped a hole in the netting. It almost pulled the bag out through this hole. Gordon noted that the animal also apparently managed to sneak into his vestibule and chew up some of his trash without waking any of us up. Sneaky bastard! At this point we decided it was probably a good idea to hang our food tonight. I’ve backpacked thousands of miles and kept my food in the tent with me and never had a problem or heard of anyone having a problem. The point of doing this of course is to prevent animals from getting into your food. Mice, squirrels, chipmunks, and bears can all figure out a bear hang pretty easily. Most animals are deterred by the human presence near the food. But last night was that night that we fear. I thought a bear was coming in. 

Just couldn’t get it through that hole.

We tried going back to sleep but were too shaken up. After about an hour of messing around on our phones the animal wandered right past Gordon’s shelter. We all said fuck this were not going to be able to sleep and decided to make a fire. Since it had rained for hours finding dry wood was a little difficult but we managed to find some under a bunch of thick canopied limber pine and other conifers. After many tries we got the fire going by using a backpacking stove to light up some small sticks. We got the fire raging and warmed ourselves up. It was very cold out at 11,200 feet where we were camping. We hung out and talked for a few hours until we half cowboy camped near the fire, dozing a few minutes at a time until we had to get more firewood. At 4 a.m. we decided to pack up and start hiking. We hit the trail around 5. 

Christian hikes with this tortured cat strapped to his pack. He was forced to buy it after accidentally breaking a ring in a store.

The hike up Georgia Pass was windy, cold and foggy. There were some snow patches left and I saw a snowshoe hare! Near the top of the pass alpine plants were blooming everywhere! Just a few inches tall and blooming in bright blue, yellow and white. As we descended the pass it began to clear, giving way to picturesque misty mountain views. My right knee also started to really hurt when going downhill. I tried downing a bunch of ibuprofen to dull the pain and it helped a little. 

Alpine forget-me-nots!


Most of the hike today was beautiful mixtures of coniferous forests and meadows. Unfortunately some of these meadows exist only because of the devastating mountain pine beetle which have killed off most off the pine trees in some areas. It is an unusual forest pathology issue because all the players in this destruction are native to the areas the damage is occurring. This beetle usually only attacks weak or dying trees. What caused this outbreak of the beetle to occur is that several years of hot and dry summers and mild winters stressed out the trees to a point where they’re all suitable hosts. I study bark and ambrosia beetles for my graduate degree so this hits close to home.

Area devastated by mountain pine beetle
We finally made it to the highway where we could hitch into Breckenridge just as my knee felt like it was going to give way. Then it started to downpour. We took the free bus to town and got some gourmet pizza and then unsuccessfully looked for a place to stay the night. It’s the 4th of July weekend and the town is insanely crowded. After much frustration we find a hotel for a reasonable price in The nearby town of Frisco. Christian, Gordon and I make it to the hotel on the free bus. The clerk there says, “Ifa you wanna to smoka da ganja, just go take a walk, don’t do it in da room.” We try to watch some tv but it’s stuck on the History Channel which is running a marathon of American Pickers. Oh well it’s something on the magic picture box. I fall asleep early and it’s one of the best nights sleep I’ve had in a very long time.